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Grants, Accolades and Awards

Christina Lux, associate director of the Center for the Humanities, has been awarded Honorable Mention for Best Paper of the Year from the Ecological Society of America ’s Education Section. Lux was part of an interdisciplinary and multi-university team of collaborators who wrote a Bioscience article titled “Poetry as a Creative Practice to Enhance Engagement and Learning in Conservation Science.” The piece, which draws upon peer-reviewed literature, explores the benefits of integrating science and poetry to further conservation scientists’ creative practices.

Sociology Professor Tanya Golash-Boza has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant for her project "Prisoner Re-Entry and Gentrification." With this funding, Golash-Boza will explore how gentrified and diverse neighborhoods help or hinder prisoners' reintegration into society. Focusing on her hometown of Washington, D.C., Golash-Boza aims to develop an understanding of barriers the formerly incarcerated face to better inform policy for reintegration and reduce individuals' odds of returning to prison.

Political Science Professor Jessica Trounstine's book "Segregation by Design: Local Politics and Inequality in American Cities" has been recognized with two American Political Science Association (APSA) section book awards. The book was awarded the J. David Greenstone Book Prize from the Politics and History Section, as well as the Best Book in Race, Ethnicity, and Urban Politics from the Race, Ethnicity, and Politics section. In "Segregation by Design," Trounstine explores more than 100 years’ worth of data from thousands of American cities to understand how local governments generate race and class segregation within and between cities, often at the expense of people of color and the poor in order to enhance the wealth and resources of white property owners.

 

The Geological Society of America (GSA) named Professor Asmeret Asefaw Berhe the winner of this year’s Randolph W. "Bill" and Cecile T. Bromery Award for the Minorities for her internationally recognized outstanding contributions to the geosciences through impressive scholarly productivity, scientific advances on erosion and fire effects on soil carbon cycling, professional service and leadership, mentoring and training of a diverse team of early career professionals, and broadening participation of underserved and marginalized geoscientists. The GSA recognizes outstanding scientific achievement and distinguished service to the profession each year at its Annual Meeting & Exposition, which is scheduled for late September in Phoenix.

Professor Ahmed Sabbir Arif and his co-investigators received the Michael A. J. Sweeney Award for the Best Student Paper at the 45th annual Conference on Computer Graphics, Visualization and Human-Computer Interaction (GI 2019) , May 28–31, 2019, in Ontario, Canada. His paper, WiseType: A Tablet Keyboard with Color-Coded Visualization and Various Editing Options for Error Correction, presents a novel virtual keyboard. 

The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences has awarded molecular cell biology Professor Nestor J. Oviedo and his lab $307,432 for one year to study the effects of direct-current stimulation in adult tissues.

The National Institute of Mental Health, part of the National Institutes of Health, has granted psychology Professor Sidra Goldman-Mellor $448,563 for three years to use California emergency department patient data to examine how suicidal behavior in adolescence affect teens' long-term risks for health problems and healthcare utilization.

UC Merced professor Ming-Hsuan Yang, in the School of Engineering’s Electrical Engineering and Computer Science program has received the AMiner Most Influential Scholar Annual Award in recognition of his “outstanding and vibrant contributions to the field of Computer Vision.” The award names the world's top-cited research scholars from the fields of Artificial Intelligence (AI), and recognizes outstanding technical achievements with lasting contribution and impact to the research community.

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science graduate student Thomas Thayer presented won the best paper award at the IEEE International Conference on Automation Science and Engineering (CASE) for his paper “Multi-Robot Routing Algorithms for Robots Operating in Vineyards,” that focuses on RAPID (Robot Assisted Precision Irrigation Delivery), a scalable irrigation management solution that aims to help vine growers with water conservation efforts while improving yield and quality. 

Political science Professor Alexander Theodoridis has been awarded the Society for Political Methodology’s 2019 Miller Prize for the best paper in the influential journal Political Analysis with his paper "Worth Weighting? How to Think About and Use Weights in Survey Experiments."